Budget-Friendly Carburetor Buyer’s Guide

LEAD-ART-carb If you haven’t considered installing a brand-new carburetor lately, here’s something to keep in mind: Most don’t require much effort to install, generally have the potential to free up hidden power and fuel mileage, don’t require much maintenance, and are pretty affordable. Many are ready to go right out of the box, only requiring an idle or primary jet adjustment to dial it in. This “set it and forget” attitude makes installing a new carb that much easier; getting your sled back out on the road in no time. Read more
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Bearing Clearance Basics

One of the abilities that separates the experienced engine builders from the novices is properly fitting the bearing clearances for both the crank and rod journals From the December, 2011 issue of Circle Track By Jeff Huneycutt When you get right down to it, many of the tasks involved in building a race are mundane. It isn’t too difficult to drop a piston in a hole or bolt up an intake manifold. And neither is checking your valve lash or fitting your main and rod bearings. The trick is knowing how to do it right, taking your time to pay attention to the details and having the proper tools which can make your life a lot easier. Read more
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Are 4 bolt main blocks that much stronger than 2 bolt main blocks?

4_bolt_main Lets start with what a 2 and 4 bolt main is anyway. What holds your crankshaft in are main caps. These are what the crank bearings sit in and most engines have 5 caps. A 2 bolt cap is fastened to the block by 2 bolts and a 4 bolt cap has 4 bolts (2 on each side). Main caps are the only thing keeping your crank from falling out the bottom of your engine. When you increase the load on the crank, you inherently increase the load on the main caps. Any time you increase horsepower, torque and cylinder pressure, you increase crankshaft load. It would take quite a bit more stress to rip-out 4 bolts than it would just 2, so that’s why the 4 bolt mains are stronger than the 2 boilt mains. This is the theory behind it anyway. I have to say though… I have never seen a crank get “blown-out” of an engine, be it a 2 bolt or a 4 bolt main engine. I have seen engines “blow-up”, leaving pieces of crank and engine block all over the track but it is usually due to metal fatigue and failure somewhere else and not the main caps blowing-off. Read more
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Tech Tip – Keeping Debris Out Of Your Engine

ctrp_0910_02_z+replacing_head_gaskets+engine_block Here is a good way to keep debris from falling into the cylinders and getting down into the piston rings. All you need is an old set of piston rings and some paper towels. Place the paper towel over the cylinder, then lay the piston ring over the towel, press it into the cylinder, trim the towel, and you’re ready to clean all the old head gasket off of the block. When you’re done cleaning all of the gasket residue off, carefully pull the towel and ring out together. Read more
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