TECH: MSD Crank Trigger Setup and Rotor Phasing

crank01
  1. Remove mechanical advance mechanism and/or lock it out on the distributor. You should not have any advance mechanism setup in the distributor! There are different ways to disable or lock out advance mechanisms, see your distributor instructions for details.
  2. Bring the engine up to TDC on #1 Cyl on the compression stroke.
  3. Roll engine on over to approximately 30 degrees advance BTDC, or whatever base timing you’re targeting for full advance on the engine.
  4. Crank Trigger wheel should be mounted so that one of the four magnets is lined up approximately with the sensor bracket hole when it’s in the center position in it’s travel. There is only about 20 degrees of adjustment in the Sensor Bracket, so setting the trigger wheel in this fashion should give you plenty of adjustment in both directions. Also make sure the Arrow on the trigger wheel is visible, it should face out (away from the engine). Failure to do so will have the wrong polarity on the magnets and cause false triggering at higher RPMs.
  5. Install Sensor into adjustable bracket. Sensor should be centered on the trigger wheel front to back. If it isn’t, you may have to add or remove shims from the adjustable trigger mount. You should have about .050 to .080 air gap between the sensor and the trigger wheel. Avoid using less gap than .050 as any radial run out in the balancer may cause the wheel to hit the sensor. Read more
It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

New Dayton Area Car Site!

streetscene I’d like to announce a new local site for the Dayton, Ohio area. Dayton Street Society, the home for Dayton and surrounding area car scene. Everyone is welcome, imports, domestics, bikes or race cars. So if you are local, check it out! http://www.daytonstreetsociety.com/
It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Contents of salvage yard that closed in 1953 headed to auction

Enidprojectcarauction_02_800-700x525   While car collectors in Oklahoma might have heard about it, not many actually got to see the inside of Oliver Jordan’s Enid, Oklahoma-based salvage yard. That’s because, in a decades-long fight with local officials, he guarded it from sight, ringed it with barbed wire, and hardly let a soul in to see it. This summer, however, the gates to the yard will open up for one last time as the entire collection heads to auction. Read more
It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
1 20 21 22 23 24 79