My Grandfather’s 1937 Chevy Pickup

20130601_163408 This is my grandfathers (now my Uncle’s) 1937 Chevy Pickup, with a 216ci Straight Six in it. Some of my oldest memories are of exploring this truck when it was buried to the frame sitting in my grandmother’s barn when I was a child. Chickens, birds and who knows what else had made the cab their home. After years or work and restoration, it’s now driveable once again and in great shape, with everything under the body either new or rebuilt and painted. Though the trip up here for my grandmother’s 81st birthday took it’s tool as one of the front lights, and a few beauty rings decided to depart at highway speed (way faster than this truck was meant to go lol). I’m very happy to see it on the road again and to know that it was saved, and I know my grandfather is looking down and smiling his old truck has a new life. More photos below. Read more
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How to ship a Vega

cid_7B198BCF73A940A88E86D9F3249EF556UserPC_zpsec7dd30c Until the early 1960s, automobiles moved by rail were carried in boxcars. These were 50 feet long with double-wide doors.Inside was room for four full-sized sedans on a two-tier rack – two raised up off the floor on a steel rack and two others tucked in underneath them.This protected the cars during transport but wasn’t very efficient, as the weight of four vehicles was far less than the maximum weight a boxcar that size could carry. When 85-foot and 89-foot flatcars came into service, it was possible to pack a total of fifteen automobiles in one car on tri-level auto racks. Read more
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