What Happens When You Put The Tires From A Camaro Z/28 On A 1LE?

2014-Chevrolet-Camaro-Z28-Red-700x340 Many of those who doubt the capabilities of the Camaro Z/28 claim the car is not well engineered, but rather owes its performance gains to its sticky Pirelli Trofeo R tires. There is no doubt those near-slicks contribute to the car’s performance, but is that really what makes the Z/28 so fast? Motor Trend was curious too and rather than arguing on the internet about it, they put the theory to the test. It just so happened that MT had both a 2014 Camaro 1LE and a Camaro Z/28 on hand for two separate tests. Figuring out how much of a difference the Pirelli Trofeo R tires make on the 5th generation Camaro was simple: swap the wheels and tires from the 1LE to the Z/28 and vice versa. Then run the cars down the drag strip, on the skid pad and on the figure eight and record the results. Read more
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Zora Mid-Engine Corvette To Show Face By 2017

2014-Chevrolet-Corvette-C7-Stingray-logo Yes, you read that right. In 2017, the Corvette will finally introduce a mid-engine layout it was always meant for, with the C8 Corvette Zora, or perhaps the C7 Corvette ZR1. Of course, those in-the-know have long heard murmurings of a mid-engine ‘Vette, and Chevy has even built several prototypes in the past – such as the 1976 Aerovette and the 1990 CERV III. But General Motors has always entertained the idea with caution, knowing that it’s an expensive change, and one that could potentially alienate a lot of the brand’s die hard loyalists. Apparently, Chevrolet has decided that America is finally ready. The new Zora-ZR1 supercar will sit at the top of the Corvette range, above the 650 hp Z06, and (for a time) stand alone in offering the MR layout, likely sold alongside the current C7. It’s expected to still maintain Chevrolet’s beloved Small Block in some form, although specific powertrain details are a mystery. And while reports believe that the Zora will keep the aluminum space frame currently seen in the C7 in some way, we have reasons to believe the Corvette C8 will introduce a new platform entirely. As for the body, we could see carbon fiber doors over the current fiberglass ones. and while Car and Driver believes the chassis will still make use of reworked magnetorheological dampers, control arms and composite leaf springs, we also believe a new suspension system will be introduced. Though, at this moment, the shroud of mystery is still very much covering the 2017 Corvette Zora-ZR1, and only serves to pique our interest even more. After all, the news of a mid-engine American sportscar is something we’ve not had since the Pontiac Fiero. We just want to buy the C8 a drink and ask all about its powertrain options, new architecture, when it thinks it’ll be ready to become America’s only Corvette, etc. But as they say, good things come to those who wait. Credit: http://gmauthority.com/blog/2014/09/zora-mid-engine-corvette-to-show-face-by-2017/#ixzz3D8tbQZRd
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A deeper look at the small-block heart of the next Corvette

If it’s never been said before that the cornerstone to General Motors performance is the small block V8, well, it ought to be on a factory plaque somewhere. And maybe some t-shirts. We can start printing up the latter right now: The General’s evergreen performance linchpin is getting a 21st-century makeover in the form of this all-new 6.2-liter LT1. Revealed this morning at GM’s Powertrain Development Center in Pontiac, Michigan, the new small block will be at the heart of the 2014 C7 Chevrolet Corvette, and variants are also expected to find their way into other GM vehicles in short order, including the automakers’ full-size Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups (which are also on schedule for new 2014 models). We revealed the key specs as the press conference unfurled this morning: a minimum of 450 horsepower and 450 pound-feet of torque, 0-60 in under four seconds for the base Corvette and at least 27 miles per gallon. Critically, despite being a large displacement engine, the fifth-generation small block stays true to its roots with a compact footprint – GM claims the engine is four inches lower and more compact overall than BMW’s 4.4-liter twin-turbo V8, yet it weighs 40 pounds less. Important new technologies include direct injection and continuously variable valve timing, along with Active Fuel Management (read: cylinder deactivation), a functionality that GM tried to input on the last Corvette (officials admitted they had to scuttle the tech due to refinement issues, but those problems have been solved now). All that new hardware means that the LT1 is actually slightly heavier than the outgoing LS3 V8, but it’s still very lightweight. Traditionalists will appreciate that the cam-in-block pushrod engine keeps the bore spacing and block length of its predecessors, but make no mistake, this is an all-new engine – the sum total of the carryover parts fit comfortably inside a small Ziplock baggie. Read more
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This Is What The 2014 Corvette’s 450-Horsepower V8 Sounds Like

The engine, which shares its name with the LT1 that powered the Corvette in the early 1990s, has preliminary figures that place it at 450 horsepower and 450 pound feet of torque. Fuel cut off is at 6,600 RPM, and for the nerds among you that want to geek out at little details, the cylinders fire in the following order: 1, 8, 7, 2, 6, 5, 4, 3. Take a quick listen to the new Heartbeat of America above. Source: Jalopnik
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GM High-Tech Performance Gen5 LT1 Small Block engine build

The next generation Corvette engine is the Gen V LT1, which is a direct injected V8. There was a ton of speculation about the displacement, with early reports placing it at 5.5 liters, like the C6R race car. This morning, GM has confirmed that the LT1 will be a 6.2 liter engine. It also gets some advanced tech. The LT1 has cylinder deactivation to increase fuel mileage, which is reportedly more than 26 MPG on the highway, direct injection, dry sump lubrication (which will be an optional extra), and variable valve timing. While more efficient, the LT1 is also expected to provide a nice power increase over the current LS3. With at least 450 horsepower and 450 pound feet of torque, the LT1 is up 20 horsepower and 26 pound feet of torque. It actually has a slightly better power curve than the might LS7 that currently powers the Corvette Z06. Read more
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